Tag Archives: waterfall

Jumble Hole Rambles

Stone waterfall 2

A mid-October ramble started with an easy walk along the canal to Callis Bridge. Crossing the road, we turned right up Jumble Hole Road then followed a path on the left side of the stream. Amongst the very pretty trees and undergrowth we spied a number of old broken down buildings giving the impression that this was once a village in the industrial era.

Mini moors 1We came to the remains of a mill confirming this view. With no way to carry on up the left side of the stream, we crossed via a bridge running parallel to a stunning waterfall.

We then ascended a steep tarmac path before veering off onto a smaller path back along the route of the stream albeit a lot higher up.

Further on, we had a choice of several forks in the path and took one going down to a cute stone bridge we knew well. Traversing the stream once again, we climbed up to a different path leading back down towards the Pennine Way.

The steep climb and lack of stopping places rendered us in severe need of R&R (rest and refreshment).

Kinky bridgeWe sat on a flat rock which had become so overgrown that it resembled a mini moor.

After a picnic, we embarked on the last part of our ramble. This involved a steep descent making us footsore.

However, we still managed to laugh at the sign for ‘Lacy underbridge’ as we emerged back onto the main road!

 

9 - Small ruined house 1Visiting the clough again the following April, we noticed that some of the old ruins had been demolished, but we found a tiny house to explore.   Taking care not to sink into the several inches of mulch, we marvelled at the small dimensions including the very low ceiling that must have been in place judging by the evidence remaining.

 

10 - Pikachu woods 3

After crossing near the waterfall and climbing up the valley side, we turned left up a different path than last time, which took us through a strange ‘Pikachu’ woods . Moss had grown round the bottom of all the trees creating weird animal-looking formations.

Following a steep climb, we eventually came out onto a grassy lane.

 

11 - Spring lamb 3

We took a somewhat circuitous route via a dodgy path to Great Rock where we enjoyed lovely views and a picnic. We then walked down a very pretty road, with spring lambs aplenty.

 

12 - Stocks

 

At the village of Cross Stones, we laughed at the stocks and wondered if they were still in use, before walking the rest of the way down to the bus stop.

 

An alternative route into Jumble Hole cCough involved catching a bus with a friend up to Blackshaw Head. Alighting near the graveyard, we walked down following the’ Calderdale way’ signs.

Alpaca family 4This took us along small paths. Somewhat overgrown in July, the stone paving rendered them still navigable. I picked wild grasses and stopped to look at stone troughs, wild flowers and unexpected llamas.

 

 

Staups Mill 2We turned left at a wooden gate and traversed a field of sheep down to a wooden bridge into the clough. We crossed the bridge and followed the path along the streamto Staups Mill.

After a picnic, we continued down the clough and back across the stream at the arched bridge. From there we climbed towards the Pennine way and along smaller paths homeward, admiring the lovely hedgerow flowers along the way.

Harebells 2Later in summer, I took my partner the route my friend had shown me. We admired colourful flowers, long grasses and curious alpacas (with babies this time) on our way down to the clough.  We stopped in the lovely meadow above the clough lingering to take in the scenery. Delicate harebells contrasted with the lush grass.

 

We then crossed the bridge and along the path to Staups Mill. From there we decided to take a new route going downwards which eventually led to the cute stone bridge in Staups Clough.

Again we chose a different, lower, path to the usual.  We expected it would eventually lead back up to the path with the ‘mini moor’. It didn’t. Instead, we found ourselves following a narrow, overgrown path almost at the top of the tree line. A veritable jungle in places, we had to watch our step.

Eventually it led down to the paved path we knew. Tired form the effort, we stopped at the graveyard at the now-ruined Mount Olivet Chapel before continuing down.

Hedgerow flowers 3

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Circular Walks Through Crow Nest

Crow Nest bluebells with twisty treeWe know Crow Nest Woods well, but always find something new every time we visit. This time, we headed straight up to the top of the woods, bearing South East.

The early autumn leaf mulch which crunched beneath our boots kept the mud below at bay and made for an easy climb. We then followed a less-trodden path along the ridge, where the only other being was a black cat eying us warily.

Beech trees with red stones 4As we tried to avoid stinging nettles and bramble thorns, the woods changed from beech to birch.

Navigating our way through a split tree and down onto Spencer Lane for a short stretch, we Wood Hey clough 3veered left onto Wood Hey lane.

For the first time, we noticed a sign pointing to Wood Hey Clough. We decided to explore.

It involved a very steep climb up the hill, via a footpath lined by the ubiquitous beech trees.

At the top, we were rewarded by fantastic views back down towards the valley and the sight of a kestrel hovering in the sky.

We came back out on Spencer Lane and after some exploration walked back down onto New Road.

The last part of our walk involved descending down a very dodgy path, strewn with leaves and branches, on the Western edge of Crow Nest to come out just behind Palace House Road.

Dandelion with raindropsOne early May Sunday, the sky brightened after a dreary morning.

We took advantage of the change in the weather and climbed up to Crow Nest woods. As we reached a spot just above town, we could see people waiting around and realised the Tour de Yorkshire was due. We decided to chill and wait for it – a dull half hour of police motorbikes showing off and a few support vehicles. Eventually, the cyclists appeared but it was nothing like the Tour de France of the previous year.

Cliff with waterfall 1We then carried on walking up to the tops of the woods, looking at trees and emerging bluebells.

Following the line of the valley we came across a small world of cliffs, streams and a waterfall. What a surprise! We forded the brook from a choice of three passing points.

Tree looks like a whormI could see the road below but with no way down. Thus we carried on along the path until we could eventually join Wood Top Road. As we descended back to town, we got rained on yet again.

 

 

 

Crow Nest bluebell closeup 5As we approached the top of the wood the following spring, we were confronted by the gorgeous sight of thousands of bluebells, enhanced by fortuitous dappled sunlight.  We sat on the other side of the small stream near the top, just looking at the beautiful scene.  I had never seen it look so stunning!

We continued on the path along the top of the old quarry.  As we climbed down a few small stone steps, we turned left and perused the quarry itself.  Interestingly, the stream had dried up and there was no waterfall.  We then walked back towards town, taking a precarious flight of steps down to Palace House Road.

 

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