Tag Archives: water

Nutclough in May

Bluebells on a cliff edge 2

A glorious second week in May was marred somewhat with recurring bouts of sinusitis and an altercation with a neighbour, raising my anxiety and stress levels.  Following an exhausting Saturday afternoon hacking shrubs and clearing up outside, we were determined to have some R&R on Sunday. I suggested a short walk as I was still not strong enough to go far.  We walked to the very end of the street, noting lots of hedgerow flowers, then round and down to the buttress.

Bluebells and leavesAt the bottom, we took Hangingroyd Lane to climb the steps opposite the little park and along Unity Street into Nutclough.

The stream was very low, with additional crossing points to the ‘islands’.  I was able to get much closer to the small waterfall than usual and marvelled at how much difference a short dry spell could make.

We spent a considerable time surrounded by the beautiful colours. Trees displayed an array of greens; bluebells topped walls and ridges; smatterings of yellow punctuated the palette.

The water was so blue and the reflections of trees so still that it looked like the sky.  The area became busy we families as we relaxed on the bench.

Tree reflections 7We escaped up to the top path and walked along to the stone bridge, where we debated which route to take.  We opted for the second path on the left, up towards the meadows.

A dinky craggy path led between small trees and bushes which I deduced had been planted since we last came this way.  At the top, two guys with dogs sat next to a steep stone stile.

On crossing, one of the dogs started following and pestering us.  We started up the grass path bisecting the flower meadow, resplendent with dandelions as a precursor to summertime blooms.  Put off by wandering cows, we backed down and searched for another route avoiding the canines but failed. Clambering back over the stile, being pestered again, we started to follow the line of the wall.  It became very tussocky and the darn dog followed us!  Defeated, we made our way back to the proper path.   I picked up the pace as we descended.  Phil called me to wait for him (makes a change).

Top field 1I didn’t realise it but I must have taken a right-hand fork somewhere and emerged at the bottom of the cobbled lane leading up to Hurst Road.  We jumped down a bit of a drop lay where there might have been steps once.  A smaller, unexplored path opposite looked enticing and we decided to be adventurous and follow it, only to soon emerge onto the original top path!  Phil thought it was hilarious.

We headed towards the main entrance when I suggested that as it was a day for exploring new paths, we should try the small flight of stone steps leading further up.   We found ourselves in a small wooded area, carpeted with bluebells and garlic flowers.

Garlic flowers 1Continuing up to a gate, a passive/aggressive notice on the other side declared it part of a private garden – it’s aright for some!  We emerged onto a long driveway, curving round yet more bluebell woods.  At the bottom, the stone gatepost displayed the name ‘Arnsbrae’.  How many times had we past that without noticing it? We walked down Keighley Road and into town.

In search of a refreshing pop, the cafes in the square were packed and the nearby shop shut.  We found spaces at Rendezvous on Bridge Gate.  Phil secured an outside table while I went in for drinks.  Then he decided he was hungry.  We were given both daytime and evening menus.  I settled on a wrap when we were informed that the daytime menu had just become unavailable.  We shared a hot meze off the evening menu – very tasty albeit rather more food than we had intended.

More photos at: https://1drv.ms/f/s!AjkK19zVvfQtivlkNDXZiRdvlHh4cg

Small waterfall 2

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Autumnal Cusp in Nutclough

View from the field 1

A mid-September walk with Marisa began up Valley road to reach Nutclough via the small steps.

Leaves and reflectionsAs we pootled about, we unearthed pot fragments, interesting stones, nibbled pink mushrooms and strange black fungi.  The latter were located on the far side of a felled tree but it proved worth clambering over for the unusual sight.

I later discovered they were ‘black bulgar’, common to Europe and North Americai.

We continued up and turned left along the cobbled path to ‘Stoodley View’.

Dodgy path

Marisa spotted a different path which I suspected would lead up to the field.  It turned out to be a hard, steep climb as the narrow path was littered with loose stones.

On reaching the top of ‘the field, we chose a good spot on the wall and admired the views.  Marisa then wanted to continue westwards but the path was blocked and marked ‘strictly private’.

After some further exploration, we chose the more familiar path down into Joan Wood.  This time, beech nuts made it tricky underfoot.

Emerging back on Keighley Road, we zig-zagged to Unity Street and she told me about the creation of ‘Tabernacle Row’ on the site of the old ‘tin chapel’ii.  We took a snicket to a back terrace bringing us onto the old ginnel.  Returning to town, we considered options for an early dinner.  The square was already in shadow and we went further down Bridge Gate and settled on Rendezvous Bistro.  Initially, we took seats outside.  The waiter brought us menus and regaled us with tales of his rare allergies. Having ordered ‘early birds‘ and a bottle to share, the air became chilly.  We retired inside to be warm and cosy, enjoy delicious food and linger over our wine.

A month later, I repeated this walk with Phil, albeit with some variation.  As we walked up Oldgate, we noted the changes displayed in the riverside trees and admired nasturtiums, some home to snails, on Hangingroyd Lane.

Autumnal soup 2

 

At the start of Nutclough, we noticed for the first time that it was possible to go through a gap in the wall and stand at the end of ‘the swamp’ providing a different perspective to the autumnal scene.  Over the stepping stones, a small dog yapped loudly as it retrieved a large stone from the water.

Black mushrooms 2I climbed over the felled trunk to show Phil the strange black mushrooms.  My efforts at capturing them on camera were better than last month, and I also managed to get a decent photo of the waterfall at closer quarters.  Crossing back, we continued up and paused at the stone bridge.

Phil decided to chance a slippy path down for close-ups of the other waterfall before we continued up the cobbles to Hurst Road.  We took the first path on the left thinking this would be the easiest option into the pleasant field.

But somehow we missed the detour and found ourselves climbing up the side of a muddy cow field.

Returning, we found the stile we had missed going up to reach the diagonal path to the wall.  Exhausted and dehydrated from the climb, I sat down to rest.

DragonflyI successfully fended off two over-excitable dogs when we heard hostile mooing behind us.  Unsure if the cow could jump down, we scarpered, taking the straightest route down.

Before going into Joan wood, we stopped at the verge and noticed more snails, this time clinging onto brown plants.

On Keighley road, a dragonfly lay on the pavement.  We tried to rescue it but it hopped and fluttered pathetically – I guess it had run out of power.

Notes

i.  For more information on ‘black bulgar’ see: http://www.first-nature.com/fungi/bulgaria-inquinans.php

ii. For more information on the ‘tin tabernacle’ see http://www.hebdenbridge.co.uk/news/news04/56.html

More photos at: https://1drv.ms/f/s!AjkK19zVvfQtitBylnJsE_oEzXmTEg; https://1drv.ms/f/s!AjkK19zVvfQtittB2VhG1DJxgk8QcA

Stream and waterfall

Waterworld

Pool reflections 1

A late May Sunday, we forced ourselves out of the house despite feeling tired and lazy and initially walked to the Sunday market.  Phil nipped in the newsagents while I looked at a few new stalls along the roadside.

Purple bloom with bee 2He came over and was taken by the posh pie stall with a massive queue of punters being fleeced (which later prompted us to consider ideas for selling stuff to idiots).  I said he would be better off going to the bakers, where we bought pastries at a third of the price.  We then walked up to Commercial Street and admired structured flower beds and bees.

Continuing up Keighley Road and into Nutclough, we noted several changes since our last visit in January (I don’t remember ever visiting in May before; we usually go further on our walks at this time of year).

Iron gate

 

A profusion of greenery created a picturesque frame for the iron gate.  Through the gate, we took the lower path and up steps overgrown with more greenery and yellow flowers.

Coming back up, bluebells edged the path and populated an area above a wall opposite, creating a forest amongst the ferns.

 

We proceeded down to the water where newly placed stones made it a lot easier to cross to the ‘island’.  Amongst the waterlogged ground we found more grasses and flowers.  A woman with a small dog came to talk to us and suggested going further up the clough.  I thanked her and said we did know the area.

We wandered around a while then sat on the sunken bench to eat our pies and enjoy the reflections of sky and branches in the water.  The scene was marred somewhat by a man with three kids playing at the other side of the stream, as he allowed a small boy pee in plain sight – not something you want to see when you’re eating your lunch!

White and yellow with tiny mothA more pleasant distraction was found in a moth that resembled a leaf.  As it settled on a nearby plant, we vied with each other for the best spot to get a close-up shot.  My efforts were appalling but earlier I had captured a tiny moth among a clump of small white flowers.

We then walked towards the weir and turned sharp left to take the path up, admiring the large sycamore as we reached the treetops.

On arriving at the row of houses on Sandy Gate, we walked back along the road for a short time before taking a shortcut down a path and through the car park of the Birchcliffe Centre.

Back in town, we crossed the busy pedestrian area and went down by the river to look at crows and pigeons behaving strangely in the late afternoon sun.

More photos at: https://1drv.ms/f/s!AjkK19zVvfQtirNgmqDlwCvFCdPOIg

Bluebell forest