Tag Archives: Spencer Lane

New Road through Erringden

New Road cobbles 2

The last Sunday of June, we ascended Palace House Road planning to go straight up to Crow Nest wood.

Purple foxglove 2Initially taking our usual path upwards, we made frequent stops to admire foxgloves in various shades of pink, purple and white and tried to capture bees on camera as they foraged for nectar.  Halfway up, I noticed a footpath leading off from the right with a sign pointing up to ‘Bar Cliff’ and suggested we try it for a change.

Along a walled path, we got different views of the town and surrounds and could hear the handmade parade party in the park.  We emerged near Weasel Hall, and continued up, following the cobbled New Road (well, I guess it was new once) up and round, noting the different coloured flowers.  At the summit, the wind picked up and I held onto my hat until we arrived at Old Chamber.

At the next the corner, we paused to look at grazing sheep: small family groups sat peaceably; lambs bleated and demanded ewe’s milk between munching grass; scruffy adults moulted wool.    We turned left and searched for a suitable stone to rest on, finally settling on the verge.  A woman passed by, with a mincing gait, which we cruelly mimicked behind her back.

But as we continued down Spencer Lane, care was needed to navigate the close-set cobbles and I laughed at Phil’s delicate steps. “who’s mincing now?”

Shiny beeReaching the bottom of the lane we took a shortcut back to the narrow lower path through Crow Nest.  Passing the quarry, we noticed the stream now headed westwards down the middle of the path for a short distance before tipping over the cliff edge.  So that’s where it had disappeared to! We continued until we arrived at the path we had started out on.

Within the hedgerow, a shiny been settling on bramble blossom caught my eye.

 

 

I remarked it had been a long circuitous walk considering the small area we had covered.  Back on Palace House Road, we took the side lane down to the canal and noted very large balsam plants growing amidst the setts of the run-off, safe from the wrath of the balsam-bashers. We walked along the north side crossing at Blackpit lock to return home via Hebble End.

Spencer Lane 3

 

More photos at: https://1drv.ms/f/s!AjkK19zVvfQtirofLlQswnIIvNq2vQ

Notes:Erringden is derived from the Norse Heyrikdene; Valley of Erik or ‘Valley of the High Ridge’.  see:  http://www.hebdenroyd.org.uk/erringden/index.html

Wood Hey Circulars

Evening gambol 1One fine spring evening, we met at the train station for a short stroll. The walk took us up Wood Top Road towards ‘wood Hey’.

Evening round upAt the corner we watched the pastoral scene of a sheepdog and shepherd working and admired the views up Spencer Lane.

We turned up Wood Hey Lane and paused again to be entertained by adorable lambs gambolling in the field – they seemed to be watching us too!

Clough with birch treesWe continued to ‘Stubb Clough’. This cute clough is created by Calder Brook as it flows towards the River Calder, creating a tiny enclave of streams and glades amongst the farmland.

Taking a path through a field onto Carr Lane and crossing the railway line, we emerged near the old Walkey’s Clogs mill.

No unauthorisedWe then explored ‘Hawks Clough’ which is really a misnomer.

The diversion took us in a semi-circle over a hump to come out further down Caldene Avenue.

The walk became less picturesque as we encountered the industrial estate. I was outraged to see someone had slaughtered several pussy willow trees in their prime but amused by impromptu art in a tyre yard. We returned to town via the ‘cycle path’.

An assortment of leavesRecently, we began a late summer walk through Crow Nest woods admiring an assortment of leaves and mushrooms, some clinging like stone to tree trunks.  We took the middle path via the picturesque ex-quarry examining the changing colours.  We then proceeded up Wood Hey lane and beyond Shroggs Clough. We followed the lane down until it became Nest Lane.

This proved an easy and straightforward route to Mytholmroyd. Arriving in the village centre, we enjoyed a pint in the Dusty Miller.  A walk back along the canal and ‘cycle path’ provided amusement in the form of Guardianistas foraging for blackberries (although I did point out I had done the same the day before).

More photos at: http://1drv.ms/1bYhOpW; http://1drv.ms/1KKQk3v