Tag Archives: ruins

Tat and Leaves

Puddle and leaves 3Another grey day, but desperate for some air, we took the opportunity to visit the first floor of Hebble End Mill.

Hebble End mill 4The so-called ‘vintage sale’ proved to be a load of tat but the building was great. White-washed walls juxtaposed with hanging fabrics and trailing wires while leftover paraphernalia provided props for hanging clothes.

Hebble End mill 5As we took our photos, a woman asked if we were industrial spies. The mission took only a few minutes and we continued along to Blackpit Lock.

For a change, we crossed the bridge and trod the path on the other side. Now the reflections in the water became framed by structural plants reaching optimistically sky-ward

We were forced to turn left near the canal overflow, where the rippling water cascaded down into the river.

Further up, we examined old ruined buildings and an old tree-lined road.

The Old Pattern Works 3After some exploration, we went up the short flight of steps to Palace House Road and walked along to The Old Pattern works.

We perused the renovated exterior and the backyard, now converted into ‘luxury holiday cottages’.

We continued on the road. Reaching the train station, we crossed back over the river.

I spotted a heron on the weir – my efforts to capture it on camera were dire. At Mayroyd we bypassed the canal up to Station Road. I saw a huge squirrel dashing down a tree but it was too fast to photograph.

A day for bad wildlife photography obviously!

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Canal and plants

Canal to Callis

Callis wood wonderland 1

Last Sunday was another bright October day. We set off towards Hebble End and westwards along the canal.

I spotted someone filming the scene on an ipad and wondered aloud how many crap videos we must be on. My partner played up to the camera, doing a very silly jig.

We bumped into a friend and walked her to the pub where she was meeting up with other people. After saying goodbye, we carried on along the towpath.  We enjoyed the patchy sunshine and joked about walkers in their hiking gear.

Abandoned bridge 1Just before Callis, we spotted a bridge over the river we had not noticed before and clambered through undergrowth for a closer look. We deduced it must be an old bridge although built up with concrete at a later date. Derelict-looking buildings stood behind, one of which appeared modern.

Callis wood wonderland 4We then found the path leading to the ‘wood wonderland’. I had known of its existence for some time but had never explored. Someone had obviously put some effort into making it attractive.

Following the path, we spotted various features including wigwams, birds hanging in trees, trees with tiny apples, chairs stood in a glade and a lovely arch at the start (we had done the walk backwards).

From Callis Bridge, we walked across the road for some exploration at the bottom of Jumble Hole Road and contemplated the old Lancashire/Yorkshire boundary.

Callis wood wonderland 7More photos at: http://1drv.ms/1Qntj8e

Changing Landscapes in Crimsworth Dean

Old road with tree 1

An alternative to the ever-popular Hardcastle Crags, a ramble through the nearby Crimsworth Dean took us on a journey through numerous landscapes.

Woodland flowers 1At the top of Midgehole Road we skirted the edge of the crags passed the overflow car park. We walked up the bridleway, and climbed, and climbed.

Soon after the apex we found a small path going down to the right and headed through woods planted in the 1830’s with Scottish spruce and beech. We took time to admire spring flowers and tiny birds flitting amongst the trees.

Crimsworth brook 1Descending further, we navigated across felled trees, impromptu streams and small waterfalls until we reached a very pretty bridge over Crimsworth dean brook.

After crossing we turned right again and followed the line of the brook on the other side of the clough.

Large stone with ruin 1The landscape changed every time we passed over a boundary. From a posh garden and through wetland, we came into a moor-like field, complete with tiny ruins and huge stones.

A perfect spot for a picnic.

The next boundary brought us back into woodland. We came across a crop of garlic. Pausing to pick some, we discovered most of it was growing in bog making harvesting rather tricky. We then chose from two paths to go down to the water’s edge.

Mill pond with duck familyThis took us to a series of industrial ruins.

On an old mill pond we took time to watch a family of ducks calmly paddling away from us.

We then proceeded along the man-made landscape and came upon a huge dam wall. We marvelled at its dimensions then carried on into a more pastoral scene where lone trees adorned pretty green fields. Pausing again to take in the views, we came out through a wooden gate back onto Midgehole road.

Old dam wall 6More photos at: http://1drv.ms/1QpWlVn

Bus Up, Walk Down

Blake Dean - Dappled treeDuring the summer months, a community bus runs from town up to Widdop. We have made use of this service on several occasions. Usually, we alight at Blake Dean then choose a walking route back down the valley.

Blake Dean (or Black Dean as it was known in the olden days) is a picturesque spot.   Nestled at the confluence of Graining Water and Reaps water, on a warm sunny day it can be full of people picnicking and bathing on one of the small islands formed where the two tributaries meet to become Hebden Water. If it is not too busy, we pause to take in the pretty features including gnarly trees, stone posts and an old wooden bridge.

Blake Dean - ripples in the streamOn a recent visit, despite the forecast assuring us there was 0% ‘chance of rain, it started showering the second we alighted from the bus! Convinced it would pass, we proceeded into the dean regardless.

A heavier burst of rain required us to take shelter for several minutes.   Whilst standing under a tree, I noticed the ripples created by raindrops falling in the water.  Also, the nice thing about the changeable weather was having the place to ourselves..

A walk along the left hand side of Hebden Water brings us to the remains of the Trestle Bridgei. From there, the path becomes rather dodgy and eventually forces us to find a safe place to ford the river. We then follow the path on the right hand side into the woods.

Alive with all types of trees, mushrooms, and lichens, this is another good place to linger. We have a favourite flat rock where we may stop for a picnic with little chance of being disturbed.

Upper crags - Flat rockAn alternative route onto this path is to descend off the main road opposite Gorple gate.

This also affords a good view of the Trestle Bridge from above. A series of steep, small steps, festooned with vegetation, takes us down to the river path and into the woods.

Due to the cliffs which feature heavily in the ‘Upper Crags’, the path deviates from the river necessitating clambering up and down at times.

A top path also eventually leads down to the crags.   Staying on the left side of Hebden Water, this route is even less well-maintained and boggy in places which could be a deliberate ploy to put walkers off.

The path becomes very narrow and overgrown too. A rickety ‘bridge’ made of plywood over a brook, leads into a private garden and then onto a lane. Again, we emerge in the woods and proceed downwards towards civilisation.

Hermits caveOn the way back down, we may stop at one of two places for liquid refreshment. Gibson Mill marks the border between the less populated Upper Crags and the better-known part of Hardcastle Crags.

Facilities include a cafe and ‘eco bogs’. Several times we have just managed to order coffee by the skin of our teeth.

Towards closing, a man who looks like he means business appears on ‘cup patrol’. It’s worse than being harassed out of the pub at last orders!

Continuing to walk the length of the crags along the bottom path, we often pop in for a cheap pint at The Blue Pig. We are frequently forced to move away from the riverside benches though, having been eaten alive by midges.

Following the river back into town, we will have walked the whole length of Hebden water – not counting the last part where it flows into the Calder.

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i For information on the Trestle Bridge: http://www.milltownmemories.org.uk/mm8/7.html

Jumble Hole Rambles

Stone waterfall 2

A mid-October ramble started with an easy walk along the canal to Callis Bridge. Crossing the road, we turned right up Jumble Hole Road then followed a path on the left side of the stream. Amongst the very pretty trees and undergrowth we spied a number of old broken down buildings giving the impression that this was once a village in the industrial era.

Mini moors 1We came to the remains of a mill confirming this view. With no way to carry on up the left side of the stream, we crossed via a bridge running parallel to a stunning waterfall.

We then ascended a steep tarmac path before veering off onto a smaller path back along the route of the stream albeit a lot higher up.

Further on, we had a choice of several forks in the path and took one going down to a cute stone bridge we knew well. Traversing the stream once again, we climbed up to a different path leading back down towards the Pennine Way.

The steep climb and lack of stopping places rendered us in severe need of R&R (rest and refreshment).

Kinky bridgeWe sat on a flat rock which had become so overgrown that it resembled a mini moor.

After a picnic, we embarked on the last part of our ramble. This involved a steep descent making us footsore.

However, we still managed to laugh at the sign for ‘Lacy underbridge’ as we emerged back onto the main road!

 

9 - Small ruined house 1Visiting the clough again the following April, we noticed that some of the old ruins had been demolished, but we found a tiny house to explore.   Taking care not to sink into the several inches of mulch, we marvelled at the small dimensions including the very low ceiling that must have been in place judging by the evidence remaining.

 

10 - Pikachu woods 3

After crossing near the waterfall and climbing up the valley side, we turned left up a different path than last time, which took us through a strange ‘Pikachu’ woods . Moss had grown round the bottom of all the trees creating weird animal-looking formations.

Following a steep climb, we eventually came out onto a grassy lane.

 

11 - Spring lamb 3

We took a somewhat circuitous route via a dodgy path to Great Rock where we enjoyed lovely views and a picnic. We then walked down a very pretty road, with spring lambs aplenty.

 

12 - Stocks

 

At the village of Cross Stones, we laughed at the stocks and wondered if they were still in use, before walking the rest of the way down to the bus stop.

 

An alternative route into Jumble Hole cCough involved catching a bus with a friend up to Blackshaw Head. Alighting near the graveyard, we walked down following the’ Calderdale way’ signs.

Alpaca family 4This took us along small paths. Somewhat overgrown in July, the stone paving rendered them still navigable. I picked wild grasses and stopped to look at stone troughs, wild flowers and unexpected llamas.

 

 

Staups Mill 2We turned left at a wooden gate and traversed a field of sheep down to a wooden bridge into the clough. We crossed the bridge and followed the path along the streamto Staups Mill.

After a picnic, we continued down the clough and back across the stream at the arched bridge. From there we climbed towards the Pennine way and along smaller paths homeward, admiring the lovely hedgerow flowers along the way.

Harebells 2Later in summer, I took my partner the route my friend had shown me. We admired colourful flowers, long grasses and curious alpacas (with babies this time) on our way down to the clough.  We stopped in the lovely meadow above the clough lingering to take in the scenery. Delicate harebells contrasted with the lush grass.

 

We then crossed the bridge and along the path to Staups Mill. From there we decided to take a new route going downwards which eventually led to the cute stone bridge in Staups Clough.

Again we chose a different, lower, path to the usual.  We expected it would eventually lead back up to the path with the ‘mini moor’. It didn’t. Instead, we found ourselves following a narrow, overgrown path almost at the top of the tree line. A veritable jungle in places, we had to watch our step.

Eventually it led down to the paved path we knew. Tired form the effort, we stopped at the graveyard at the now-ruined Mount Olivet Chapel before continuing down.

Hedgerow flowers 3

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A walk Through Horsehold Wood

Red woods

Horsehold Woods, Hebden Bridge

On the last Sunday in September, we set off on a walk up Horsehold Road.

Rather than following the lane up to the top, we veered off about half way up. A wooden gate led us onto a cute path which in turn led up to a ridge.

Fallen logWe paused here to take in the views of the valley below. We then carried on into Horsehold Woods.

We took our time to absorb the numerous interesting features including twisty trees, fallen branches and rocks covered in lichen. T

he undulating path became tricky in places despite the dry conditions.

We crossed a stream by way of a rickety old wooden bridge into Callis Woods.

Having gingerly navigated the crossing, we stopped for a break and marvelled at how short a distance we had travel yet how many new things we had seen.

A hidden gem indeed!

 

3 - Misericordia - 4 Calvary cWe repeated this walk on Easter Sunday. After a hot climb, we rested at the ridge where a wooden cross stood.

We marvelled at the fact that someone actually carried it up on Good Friday; no mean feat.   I posited that the road should be re-named Misericordia.

 

 

4 - Waterworld - Feeding duck 3The woods and waterfalls looked even prettier than in autumn due to the spring greenery. At one point, we were totally surrounded by waterfalls – magical! We stopped by the side of the stream and watched a duck eating moss in a very methodical fashion. We then carried on along the valley side, becoming confused when the path fizzled out necessitating a slight detour.

Arriving at a ruined building, we found the source of the confusion – a new stream had emerged thus rendering the path impassable.

5 - Trip boat dogDropping down to the canal, we stopped off at the pub.

Supping pints, we enjoyed the Easter Sunday antics including a very cute dog on the trip boat roof, until the temperature dropped towards evening.

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