Tag Archives: Oak trees

Slow Autumn in Crow Nest

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Early October brought slow changes to the woods.  On a changeable Sunday, we headed up to Palace House Road and took the first path into Crow Nest woods.  As we climbed, we picked a few remaining blackberries and popped balsam pods.  We paused to admire the gradually altering autumnal colours across the valley before coming to a fork in the path.

tree-with-balletic-armsThis time we chose to go westwards, a path we had not walked for some years.  The path was ill-maintained and tricky in places, littered with sticks and stones.  We zig-zagged to the top of the wood and figured it must be an ancient route-way as cliff-like sides and exposed tree roots suggested it had sunk a few feet over time.

 

tree-like-an-elephant-2We remarked on how different the wood looked to our last visit in May.  Patches of straw-like grass stood in the place of the earlier bluebells; multi-coloured beech leaves littered the route; half-eaten mushrooms poked out from the ground.

We carried on eastwards along the top path as it became made for elves and noticed a tree that looked like Groot (or an elephant depending on the angle).

 

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On reaching the apex, we crossed the small stream and continued down into the quarry.  Greeted by the remains of a fire, more balsam, (although dying off some still clung on), and fallen trees riddled with fungi.  I said that if it was cleaned up a bit it could be Malham Cove.

Doubling back, we came onto a narrow path behind the road.  Turning eastwards once more, we found ourselves on another old road, this time paved with cobbles, becoming slippery concrete further down.

As we emerged just north of the train station, we saw evidence of work being undertaken in the stone yard.   We picked our way through piles of stones and interesting junk to investigate. It appeared that the old watermill was being made to work again (very heartening).  From there, we walked onto Station road, across the main road and up Commercial Street.  We reached the Sunday market just in time to catch Craggs Cakes for a tasty treat.

More photos at: https://1drv.ms/f/s!AjkK19zVvfQtiOsHlBi7jIeljZ_qXw

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Our Back Yard

Eaves Wood - Down the path 2

The first Sunday of 2015 dawned bright and crisp. In the afternoon, we chased the sun up the hill through what we call ‘our back yard’ (commonly known as Eaves Wood). A climb up to Heptonstall road and a left turn, took us to possibly my favourite path along the ridge. I love all the little crevices made by the weathering of the sandy rocks and the numerous minute plants found clinging to the rock face. I could explore this tiny world for hours.

From Great Rock we took the precarious steps up and paused at ‘photographers’ corner’ where there was a bit of a lock jam. Not surprising given the views back down the valley across to Stoodley Pike. We then followed the path along, and stopped on one of the flat rocks for coffee, avoiding getting blasted by the icy air. I closed my eyes and felt the bright orange sun on my face – a real tonic.

Heptonstall - Churchyard in winter 3

We then carried on as far as the path took us turning right up the lane where we came across the tree planters. We waved in greeting then took the road down into the village. As the light faded, we lingered in the churchyard before setting off to walk back home.

Alternative route - Leaves of green and yellowWe recently discovered a different way up to the woods. I had a vague recollection of taking this less direct route some years before but unfortunately my memories were flawed.

We started out along the main road and soon after the Fox & Goose, we took a small flight of steps up. Struggling through brambles and overgrown balsam plants, we came to a dead end and concluded that we had followed a path to a telegraph pole!

 

Alternative route - Woodland den

 

We retraced our steps. About to go back down to the main road, we noticed an actual path leading further up and thought that might have been the one we had thought we were on to start with.

The sight of a woodland den prompted a joke that Ray Mears had been here recently.

We followed it up and around until we joined my favourite path from which we had a relatively easy and familiar climb.

 

More photos at: http://1drv.ms/1KrURYC; http://1drv.ms/1IKGiRP; http://1drv.ms/1MsSnXu