Tag Archives: lambs

Beyond the Treeline

Crow Nest branches and sky 1

A late April Sunday walk began with a climb up to Crow Nest wood.  We took the most direct route straight to the top treeline.

Crow Nest early bluebellThe previous seasons’ detritus crunched underfoot, broken in places by fresh spring growth.  A few early bluebells pushed up through the brown.   Above us, branches framed a fresh blue sky.  We crossed the glade at the top of the quarry, passing a clump of silver birch and noting fresh green shoots on oak and chestnuts along the tiny path.

 

We navigated the tree roots serving as steps down near Wood Top Farm.  Taking a diagonal path in front of us, we walked along the paved lane for a time, before taking a shortcut through a field into Stubb Clough.

Stubb Clough 1The brook tinkled below as we crossed the bridge and ascended the stone steps.  Emerging onto Wood Hey Lane, we continued to Park Lane.  We rested on the verge with green fields behind stone walls either side, to watch new lambs gambolling and bleating.

From there we carried on until it became Nest Lane and into Mytholmroyd.  We took the quicker way back along the canal, laughing at angry geese and wondering at iron fixtures.

 

 

More photos at: https://1drv.ms/f/s!AjkK19zVvfQtiqwfNlc8i2sm0aSUpw

 

New lambs

 

Colden to Heptonstall

Hebble Hole bridge 1

The last Sunday in March started sunny but partly cloudy, perfect for walking.  We took the quick way up through Mytholm and along the track into Colden Clough.

Lumb mill twin trees 1.jpgWe noted the newly constructed managed weir on the river just before Lumb Mill.  Stopping for a short rest, I realised I had not yet taken photos of the ‘twin trees’ with my new camera.  Halfway up the clough, we dallied in the garlic fields to pick a few early season leaves.  At Hebble Hole we crossed the clapper bridge, and took the small steps up to Hudson Mill Lane.

We continued along the road, turning left towards Colden Village and onto May’s.  I entered the farm shop to buy pies.

 

Wagtail 2I did not pick my moment well: several people arrived at the same time, including a woman in slippers and a dressing gown.  As we sat on the bench outside eating the warmed pies, we watched a pied wagtail delicately searching between the cobbles for morsels, and chatted.

 

 

Phil suggested the shop had created a culture of dependency within a 500 metre radius.  I reckoned the catchment area was somewhat wider as many people drove there.  Feeling tired, I checked the bus times but it would be almost an hour until the next one.

We walked down Edge Lane, observing our first field of new lambs, through Popples Common towards Heptonstall.  On the edge of the village, I again considered waiting for the bus.  Instead, Phil suggested visiting the Cross Inn.  We sat in the beer garden supping pints.  It started to get cooler with the waning sun.  We finally agreed to catch the bus home.  A cat followed us to the bus stop.  As we waited, I collected rather nice cedar cones form the small park on Hepton Drive.

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Sheep and lambs 2

Wood Hey Circulars

Evening gambol 1One fine spring evening, we met at the train station for a short stroll. The walk took us up Wood Top Road towards ‘wood Hey’.

Evening round upAt the corner we watched the pastoral scene of a sheepdog and shepherd working and admired the views up Spencer Lane.

We turned up Wood Hey Lane and paused again to be entertained by adorable lambs gambolling in the field – they seemed to be watching us too!

Clough with birch treesWe continued to ‘Stubb Clough’. This cute clough is created by Calder Brook as it flows towards the River Calder, creating a tiny enclave of streams and glades amongst the farmland.

Taking a path through a field onto Carr Lane and crossing the railway line, we emerged near the old Walkey’s Clogs mill.

No unauthorisedWe then explored ‘Hawks Clough’ which is really a misnomer.

The diversion took us in a semi-circle over a hump to come out further down Caldene Avenue.

The walk became less picturesque as we encountered the industrial estate. I was outraged to see someone had slaughtered several pussy willow trees in their prime but amused by impromptu art in a tyre yard. We returned to town via the ‘cycle path’.

An assortment of leavesRecently, we began a late summer walk through Crow Nest woods admiring an assortment of leaves and mushrooms, some clinging like stone to tree trunks.  We took the middle path via the picturesque ex-quarry examining the changing colours.  We then proceeded up Wood Hey lane and beyond Shroggs Clough. We followed the lane down until it became Nest Lane.

This proved an easy and straightforward route to Mytholmroyd. Arriving in the village centre, we enjoyed a pint in the Dusty Miller.  A walk back along the canal and ‘cycle path’ provided amusement in the form of Guardianistas foraging for blackberries (although I did point out I had done the same the day before).

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