Tag Archives: foxglove

Hollins to Midgehole

Lee Wood Road 6

After an unseasonably cold and wet start, mid-June brought some improvement.  I suggested a wander up Tinker Bank, but ended up walking rather further than planned.

Crossing Hebden Water at Foster Mill Bridge, we paused for fellow walkers coming the opposite way.  Below us, laden branches all but obscured the stream, hanging heavy above the silvery torrent.

Dog rose 4On the steps to Hollins, the majestic sycamore presided over an enchanting scene.  Geometric foxgloves had survived a battering from the previous night’s thunderstorm.  Bees buzzed round dog roses.  One disappeared inside a flower.  As I waited patiently for it to re-emerge, a second one landed.  After some fumbling that too vanished.  Turning right on the small path, we past the gloomy hamlet and proceeded up through the wood, mildly reeking of dankness.

 

Just Passing 4Here, bees focused on bramble blossom, so pretty I initially mistook them for another kind of rose.  Reaching Lee Wood Road, we followed signs to ‘Hebden Hey/Hardcastle Crags’.  Picturesque twisty trees and well-curated rocks soon made it apparent this was yet another Victorian construction.  Amazed at still discovering new parts of the vast National Trust estate, I wondered why we had never taken this route before.  I then recalled a foray in our early walking days, and thought maybe we had, albeit from the other direction and not quite as far.

We became hungry and weary.  Reluctant to end up in the middle of the crags, we back-tracked to a stony footpath.  As predicted, we arrived at The Blue Pig.  The outside seating area was packed!  At first, we wondered if it was illegally open.  But as the doors looked firmly shut, we concluded the regulars congregated out of habit.  I refused to sit anywhere near the flouters.  Instead, we took the snicket at the side of the small bridge into the lower reaches of the crags.  The first bench occupied by a family, I stopped in the verge.  Phil marched on.  “Where are you going!” I called after him.  He indicated a further bench that I hadn’t seen due to the tall grass.

Vergeside 1Breathless and sweaty, we collapsed with cold drinks, wishing we’d brought lunch with us.  We mustered the strength to walk back via the flattest route.  On Midgehole Road, the deep purple foxgloves contrasted with golden poppies against grey drystone walls.

Descending to the riverside, kids played on the makeshift beach. We took the less populous left-hand Foster Mill Dam path.  ‘The swamp’ exuded a strong smell of wild garlic, severely past it at this time of year.

Further on, we traced the remains of the old mill ponds and dam wall, envisioning the location of the erstwhile mill buildings.

Towards Windsor View, a dog blocked the path.  I hailed a woman gardening close by, asking her to call her mutt away so we could pass unimpeded.  Back on tarmac, I felt uncomfortably hot.  As I stripped off a layer of clothing, I heard my camera hit the pavement.  Thankfully, with firm hold of the strap, it survived unscathed.   Towards town, we returned to the riverside path.  We held our breath hurrying past a bunch of itinerant drinkers.  Phil said hello as one recognised us but I refused to open my gob until well clear.  Aware they would never change their behaviour, I really wished they wouldn’t move round so much- they were much easier to avoid in the park!  In search of instant fodder, we perused the shops to little avail.  I exited One Stop pretty sharpish as people crowded round the ice cream freezer and a massive queue for the till snaked round the aisles.  Back home, we were absolutely desperate for food and rest. I hastily assembled cheese and crackers and slumped on the sofa.

Ye olde dam wall 1

Wainsgate to Common Bank

Walking down the lane 1

A warm, sunny but occasionally breezy first Sunday in July, we had arranged to meet a friend for an arts festival event in Old Town followed by a meal at the country inn. We had intended to walk, but she had an errand in town and picked us up on her way back.  She drove up via Pecket Well and along Billy Lane, finding a spot to park near the corner of Wainsgate Lane.

Wainsgate wallpaper 1During the short stroll to the chapel, we admired the pretty cottage gardens, resplendent in the bright light.

A couple lounged on deck chairs at the entrance.  One of them was a local artist jointly responsible for the event.  She explained what to expect from the sound installation. ‘Gather’ entailed a music performance played on a loop.  As we settled on pews, among a smattering of others, the sounds of wispy singing could be heard, followed by tweeting birds, choral music and a small narrative about the Baptist Minister, John Fawcett.

The pleasant noises created a contemplative atmosphere. However, I had some trouble settling on the hard benches.  My concentration wandered to examine cracks in the crumbling plaster as the sunlight made odd reflections on the pulpit.  I turned to speak to Phil and he pointed to the slip of paper requesting peace and quiet – I suppose he thought that was funny!

Wainsgate comments 1At the end of the sound loop, I snuck out back to take photos of the kitchen.  Finding a ‘no entry’ sign on the door, I asked the artist for permission.  she obligingly led me round to the side door and left me to try and capture the interesting junk and fading wallpaper amidst shadowy light.  Back out front, kind words had been left in the comments book.

We hung around outside a while, to chat to the artist and sip water.  A selection of old photos showed the chapel choir through the ages.  We reflected on the excellent quality of the old choir recordings and marvelled that it had been recorded at all.

We walked back to the road.  Our friend drove her car down while we enjoyed a pleasant walk through the village.  We re-united at the country inn.  Armed with drinks and a menu we took seats out in the garden and chatted awhile to a mutual friend until he departed for home.  Although a pleasant breeze tempered the heat, it was hard to find a shady spot.  Eventually, we changed tables and settled down to peruse the food options.  We caught up on each other’s news until pies and more beer arrived.

Wild foxglove 2We said goodbye to our friend and took the back exit onto Lane Ends.  At the next junction, we continued straight ahead.  On Rowlands Lane, grey haze hovered over the valley bottom. Desiccated flowers and tall grasses swayed in the gentle wind.  Crows flitted from rickety gates to yellow fields.  Majestic foxgloves rose into a picture-perfect sky.  At the end of the lane, we took steps down to the edge of Dodd Naze and crossed the road to reach the public footpath where we turned left.

A short stretch, fenced in on both sides, led to the virtually dry small stream.  We stepped gingerly over stones covered in green slime into Common Bank Wood and followed the dusty path.

Tall trees provided welcome shade.  We noted that some trees had been cut down and sported signs stating that the path would be closed later for an arts festival event and wondered what that could be.

Vertigo 1

From Osborne street, we took a steep flight of steps.  The blinding sun made stark shadows on the way down to Commercial street. We had considered visiting more free events in town.  The street theatre appeared to have ended as only a few people milled about.  We wandered in vain for a couple of minutes looking for clues.  Hot, tired and thirsty, we abandoned the mission and returned home.

More photos at: https://1drv.ms/f/s!AjkK19zVvfQti4FFQuY60aCBGIn0CQ

 

New Road through Erringden

New Road cobbles 2

The last Sunday of June, we ascended Palace House Road planning to go straight up to Crow Nest wood.

Purple foxglove 2Initially taking our usual path upwards, we made frequent stops to admire foxgloves in various shades of pink, purple and white and tried to capture bees on camera as they foraged for nectar.  Halfway up, I noticed a footpath leading off from the right with a sign pointing up to ‘Bar Cliff’ and suggested we try it for a change.

Along a walled path, we got different views of the town and surrounds and could hear the handmade parade party in the park.  We emerged near Weasel Hall, and continued up, following the cobbled New Road (well, I guess it was new once) up and round, noting the different coloured flowers.  At the summit, the wind picked up and I held onto my hat until we arrived at Old Chamber.

At the next the corner, we paused to look at grazing sheep: small family groups sat peaceably; lambs bleated and demanded ewe’s milk between munching grass; scruffy adults moulted wool.    We turned left and searched for a suitable stone to rest on, finally settling on the verge.  A woman passed by, with a mincing gait, which we cruelly mimicked behind her back.

But as we continued down Spencer Lane, care was needed to navigate the close-set cobbles and I laughed at Phil’s delicate steps. “who’s mincing now?”

Shiny beeReaching the bottom of the lane we took a shortcut back to the narrow lower path through Crow Nest.  Passing the quarry, we noticed the stream now headed westwards down the middle of the path for a short distance before tipping over the cliff edge.  So that’s where it had disappeared to! We continued until we arrived at the path we had started out on.

Within the hedgerow, a shiny been settling on bramble blossom caught my eye.

 

 

I remarked it had been a long circuitous walk considering the small area we had covered.  Back on Palace House Road, we took the side lane down to the canal and noted very large balsam plants growing amidst the setts of the run-off, safe from the wrath of the balsam-bashers. We walked along the north side crossing at Blackpit lock to return home via Hebble End.

Spencer Lane 3

 

More photos at: https://1drv.ms/f/s!AjkK19zVvfQtirofLlQswnIIvNq2vQ

Notes:Erringden is derived from the Norse Heyrikdene; Valley of Erik or ‘Valley of the High Ridge’.  see:  http://www.hebdenroyd.org.uk/erringden/index.html