Tag Archives: Crow Nest Woods

New Road through Erringden

New Road cobbles 2

The last Sunday of June, we ascended Palace House Road planning to go straight up to Crow Nest wood.

Purple foxglove 2Initially taking our usual path upwards, we made frequent stops to admire foxgloves in various shades of pink, purple and white and tried to capture bees on camera as they foraged for nectar.  Halfway up, I noticed a footpath leading off from the right with a sign pointing up to ‘Bar Cliff’ and suggested we try it for a change.

Along a walled path, we got different views of the town and surrounds and could hear the handmade parade party in the park.  We emerged near Weasel Hall, and continued up, following the cobbled New Road (well, I guess it was new once) up and round, noting the different coloured flowers.  At the summit, the wind picked up and I held onto my hat until we arrived at Old Chamber.

At the next the corner, we paused to look at grazing sheep: small family groups sat peaceably; lambs bleated and demanded ewe’s milk between munching grass; scruffy adults moulted wool.    We turned left and searched for a suitable stone to rest on, finally settling on the verge.  A woman passed by, with a mincing gait, which we cruelly mimicked behind her back.

But as we continued down Spencer Lane, care was needed to navigate the close-set cobbles and I laughed at Phil’s delicate steps. “who’s mincing now?”

Shiny beeReaching the bottom of the lane we took a shortcut back to the narrow lower path through Crow Nest.  Passing the quarry, we noticed the stream now headed westwards down the middle of the path for a short distance before tipping over the cliff edge.  So that’s where it had disappeared to! We continued until we arrived at the path we had started out on.

Within the hedgerow, a shiny been settling on bramble blossom caught my eye.

 

 

I remarked it had been a long circuitous walk considering the small area we had covered.  Back on Palace House Road, we took the side lane down to the canal and noted very large balsam plants growing amidst the setts of the run-off, safe from the wrath of the balsam-bashers. We walked along the north side crossing at Blackpit lock to return home via Hebble End.

Spencer Lane 3

 

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Notes:Erringden is derived from the Norse Heyrikdene; Valley of Erik or ‘Valley of the High Ridge’.  see:  http://www.hebdenroyd.org.uk/erringden/index.html

Beyond the Treeline

Crow Nest branches and sky 1

A late April Sunday walk began with a climb up to Crow Nest wood.  We took the most direct route straight to the top treeline.

Crow Nest early bluebellThe previous seasons’ detritus crunched underfoot, broken in places by fresh spring growth.  A few early bluebells pushed up through the brown.   Above us, branches framed a fresh blue sky.  We crossed the glade at the top of the quarry, passing a clump of silver birch and noting fresh green shoots on oak and chestnuts along the tiny path.

 

We navigated the tree roots serving as steps down near Wood Top Farm.  Taking a diagonal path in front of us, we walked along the paved lane for a time, before taking a shortcut through a field into Stubb Clough.

Stubb Clough 1The brook tinkled below as we crossed the bridge and ascended the stone steps.  Emerging onto Wood Hey Lane, we continued to Park Lane.  We rested on the verge with green fields behind stone walls either side, to watch new lambs gambolling and bleating.

From there we carried on until it became Nest Lane and into Mytholmroyd.  We took the quicker way back along the canal, laughing at angry geese and wondering at iron fixtures.

 

 

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New lambs

 

Circular Walks Through Crow Nest

Crow Nest bluebells with twisty treeWe know Crow Nest Woods well, but always find something new every time we visit. This time, we headed straight up to the top of the woods, bearing South East.

The early autumn leaf mulch which crunched beneath our boots kept the mud below at bay and made for an easy climb. We then followed a less-trodden path along the ridge, where the only other being was a black cat eying us warily.

Beech trees with red stones 4As we tried to avoid stinging nettles and bramble thorns, the woods changed from beech to birch.

Navigating our way through a split tree and down onto Spencer Lane for a short stretch, we Wood Hey clough 3veered left onto Wood Hey lane.

For the first time, we noticed a sign pointing to Wood Hey Clough. We decided to explore.

It involved a very steep climb up the hill, via a footpath lined by the ubiquitous beech trees.

At the top, we were rewarded by fantastic views back down towards the valley and the sight of a kestrel hovering in the sky.

We came back out on Spencer Lane and after some exploration walked back down onto New Road.

The last part of our walk involved descending down a very dodgy path, strewn with leaves and branches, on the Western edge of Crow Nest to come out just behind Palace House Road.

Dandelion with raindropsOne early May Sunday, the sky brightened after a dreary morning.

We took advantage of the change in the weather and climbed up to Crow Nest woods. As we reached a spot just above town, we could see people waiting around and realised the Tour de Yorkshire was due. We decided to chill and wait for it – a dull half hour of police motorbikes showing off and a few support vehicles. Eventually, the cyclists appeared but it was nothing like the Tour de France of the previous year.

Cliff with waterfall 1We then carried on walking up to the tops of the woods, looking at trees and emerging bluebells.

Following the line of the valley we came across a small world of cliffs, streams and a waterfall. What a surprise! We forded the brook from a choice of three passing points.

Tree looks like a whormI could see the road below but with no way down. Thus we carried on along the path until we could eventually join Wood Top Road. As we descended back to town, we got rained on yet again.

 

 

 

Crow Nest bluebell closeup 5As we approached the top of the wood the following spring, we were confronted by the gorgeous sight of thousands of bluebells, enhanced by fortuitous dappled sunlight.  We sat on the other side of the small stream near the top, just looking at the beautiful scene.  I had never seen it look so stunning!

We continued on the path along the top of the old quarry.  As we climbed down a few small stone steps, we turned left and perused the quarry itself.  Interestingly, the stream had dried up and there was no waterfall.  We then walked back towards town, taking a precarious flight of steps down to Palace House Road.

 

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