Tag Archives: Churchyard

Eaves Wood in Snow

 

Black and white 1

Last Saturday we watched the snow falling and considered a walk.  However, we were put off by the cold, grey conditions.  After dark, the snow started melting.   So much for predictions of sub-zero temperatures and a crisp, white dawn!

Sunday started off equally cold and grey but we felt that we really ought to get out.  It started snowing again as we wrapped in layers and braved the elements.  We climbed the cuckoo steps, slowly.  At the top I already felt knackered and as the snow became heavier, I wondered aloud what the hell I was doing.  Phil said he just wanted to reach the ridge leading into Eaves Wood.  I agreed it would be a lovely scene and reluctantly followed.  On reaching the lovely path, we were greeted by an almost monochrome landscape – black hills and trees sprinkled with white against a grey sky, broken here and there by splashes of brown and red.

Black and red rock 3We continued up to Hell Hole Rocks and waited for a small child leading a family group down the steps behind before we ascended.  After another hard climb, we elected to travel along the path round to the bowling club.

Two girls were building an enormous snowman in their garden.  “That’ll be a snow giant!” I told them.

 

Forlorn pairBy then I felt much better and was actually enjoying being out on the blustery tops.  As we rounded the field, two forlorn horses trotted over to us, probably hoping for apples.  Sadly, we had nothing to give them but appreciated the opportunity to take close-ups.

We continued up Acres Lane to St. Thomas’ churchyard and cut through the church where I pointed out the Last Supper painting to Phil.

In Heptonstall village, I suggested calling on a friend.  She invited us in for a cuppa and we had a lovely time chatting until I noticed it was getting dark and time to head down the hill.  Heading down the road in the darkening, we admired views of snow and lights in the town below us (very Christmassy!).  Returning back down the cuckoo steps, I lost my footing slightly but it was due to slippery leaves rather than snow and ice.

Snowy church ruin 2

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Eaves wood to Cross Inn

sunburst-3

It was a gorgeous day for our last walk of 2016.  There had been a hard frost overnight creating an archetypal crisp, bright, winter scene.

bright-pathWe set off up the familiar cuckoo steps and along Heptonstall Road into Eaves Wood.  I had to make frequent stops as I got out of breath after the Christmas lethargy, but as always it was worth the climb.

The brilliant sun ‘up tops’ allowed me to practice using my new camera and I Phil taught me a few techniques including manually adjusting the shutter speed – a handy tip for taking photos towards the sun.

 

 

 

small-stone-stepsOn the steps behind hell hole rocks, I managed to stub my already sore toe, causing me severe pain and the need to stop.  We rested on the wall near ‘photographers’ corner’ before taking the straight path to St. Thomas’ church.

Parts of the grounds were cordoned off for work on the tower.  We detoured through the church, pausing to look round before emerging into the slippery graveyard.

 

Tentatively, we crossed into the ruined church and circumnavigated as far as possible.

Finding we could not go right the way round, we double-backed and exited towards the village.  At the Cross Inn, we enjoyed a pint and looked at the ‘winter art exhibition’ including a couple of Phil’s photos before a quick walk back down via the road.

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church-ruin-10

Downhill from Blackshaw Head

Moored boat

On the first of February scraps of snow lingered in the valley from the previous month. Despite the cold, the sun compelled us to venture out.

We took a picturesque bus ride to Blackshaw Head. The amount of snow still up on the tops made us feel as if we had gone into the mountains.  Yet we were only two miles from home. On arrival, we spotted a barn with a couple of fat sheep standing in front of it. That, and a boat in a nearby field, made for a very Nordic scene!

Grave shadows 2We cut through the churchyard where the blazing sun created long shadows of the gravestones. The bench here makes it possible to rest and maybe even have a small picnic if you are so inclined.

We walked along Badger Lane then down Marsh lane. The snow crunched underfoot as we made our way to the next junction.

Ignore your sat navWe paused to savour the views and laughed at the handmade ‘no sat nav’ sign.

We turned left onto Winter’s Lane which becomes the aptly named Dark Lane.

The going was hard due to the frozen snow where the sun never shone. However, parts that are often very boggy were easily navigated with care.

We proceeded into Rawtenstall woods and speculated about the strangely titled ‘cat steps’. They are indeed tiny enough to only be of use to small mammals.

We also noticed that we could see the main road down below, obscured at other times of year, through the leafless trees.

Cat steps 1After passing through Mytholm Steeps, we stopped at the Fox & Goose for a pint. Lots of people and dogs milled about round the bar area.

We retired to a side room and remarked on the improvements since the pub became a worker’s co-op – much cleaner and drier.

As an alternative, a pleasant walk into town can be found by crossing the main road and walking down Adelaide Street and along the river.

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Our Back Yard

Eaves Wood - Down the path 2

The first Sunday of 2015 dawned bright and crisp. In the afternoon, we chased the sun up the hill through what we call ‘our back yard’ (commonly known as Eaves Wood). A climb up to Heptonstall road and a left turn, took us to possibly my favourite path along the ridge. I love all the little crevices made by the weathering of the sandy rocks and the numerous minute plants found clinging to the rock face. I could explore this tiny world for hours.

From Great Rock we took the precarious steps up and paused at ‘photographers’ corner’ where there was a bit of a lock jam. Not surprising given the views back down the valley across to Stoodley Pike. We then followed the path along, and stopped on one of the flat rocks for coffee, avoiding getting blasted by the icy air. I closed my eyes and felt the bright orange sun on my face – a real tonic.

Heptonstall - Churchyard in winter 3

We then carried on as far as the path took us turning right up the lane where we came across the tree planters. We waved in greeting then took the road down into the village. As the light faded, we lingered in the churchyard before setting off to walk back home.

Alternative route - Leaves of green and yellowWe recently discovered a different way up to the woods. I had a vague recollection of taking this less direct route some years before but unfortunately my memories were flawed.

We started out along the main road and soon after the Fox & Goose, we took a small flight of steps up. Struggling through brambles and overgrown balsam plants, we came to a dead end and concluded that we had followed a path to a telegraph pole!

 

Alternative route - Woodland den

 

We retraced our steps. About to go back down to the main road, we noticed an actual path leading further up and thought that might have been the one we had thought we were on to start with.

The sight of a woodland den prompted a joke that Ray Mears had been here recently.

We followed it up and around until we joined my favourite path from which we had a relatively easy and familiar climb.

 

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